Mast-e stroke

The mechanism of HT after cerebral ischemia is not clearly understood. However, several clinical, radiologic, biochemical, and hematologic factors have been associated with HT. Clinical factors include severe baseline neurologic deficits (NIH Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score greater than 20), congestive heart failure, older age, elevated baseline systolic BP, 2,4,8 cardioembolic stroke, 9 and delayed administration of thrombolytic therapy. 8 In the NINDS rt-PA study, patients with a systolic BP greater than 190 mm Hg and diastolic BP greater than 100 mm Hg on admission had a higher risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. 10 Biochemical and hematologic factors, such as aspirin use, low platelet count, and hyperglycemia, have also been invoked as potential risk factors for HT. 2,4,8,11

The Mississippi Aphasia Screening Test (MAST) was developed as a brief, repeatable screening measure for individuals with severely impaired communication/language skills. Such a brief measure may be advantageous for individuals with severe language impairments who may be frustrated and stressed during lengthy testing sessions. The MAST was designed to be used for serial assessments to detect changes in language abilities over time. The MAST was initially developed by a team of neuropsychologists, physiatrists, and speech-language pathologists. The current form has nine subtests that range from 1 to 10 items per subscale. The MAST can be administered in 5 to 15 minutes. Finally, it has been utilized with a wide variety of patient populations including traumatic brain injury, stroke, epilepsy, anoxia, dementia, and various encephalopathies. Information regarding the MAST was contributed by Methodist Rehabilitation Center . Please contact Risa Nakase-Thompson, . at Email address protected by JavaScript.
Please enable JavaScript to use email address. for questions regarding the presented information. If you find the information in the COMBI useful, please mention it when citing sources of information. The information on the MAST may be cited as:

Nakase-Thompson, R. (2004). The Mississippis Aphasia Screening Test. The Center for Outcome Measurement in Brain Injury. http:///combi/mast ( accessed ).     Copyright © 1998-2012 Home | Background | Scales | Survey | Newsletter    

The following is from a knowledgable source: As far the numbering convention is concerned, the 11, 21, etc. is usually either based on the “go” of the day OR the the flight within a “go”. To explain, a “go” may usally consist of 12 jets. Of those 12, there may be three formations. Therefore, we normally assign the numbers of those formations as a sequence, . 11-14, 21-24, and 31-34. Where there are multiple flying squadrons at a base, they assign each squadron a series of 3 numbers, 0-8. Therefore, the same number suffix should not be flying with more than one formation at a time. This is also helps controls and pilots recognize their callsigns on the radio, especially if the radio transmission is clipped. For example, if all that is understood was “(radio static) 71, descend and maintain 3 thousand”, one would still know that the message was for callsign 71 and not callsign 51. The “91” callsign suffix is usually reserved for “checkride” sorties.

For patients with perfusion deficit who are not candidates for rt-PA or angioplasty, BP augmentation may be beneficial. Mean arterial pressure can be judiciously titrated with vasopressors to 120 to 140 mm Hg with frequent neurologic assessment. If no clinical improvement is seen within 72 hours of therapy, vasopressors are titrated down. In patients who have improvement with BP augmentation, an oral agent such as midodrine may be beneficial for long-term management. 22 Although study results provide preliminary evidence that increasing BP is beneficial in select patients with acute-subacute stroke, this therapy cannot be recommended for most patients. 25 Potential risks of raising BP include increased risk of hemorrhage, cardiac ischemia, arrhythmias, and congestive heart failure. *

Mast-e stroke

mast-e stroke

For patients with perfusion deficit who are not candidates for rt-PA or angioplasty, BP augmentation may be beneficial. Mean arterial pressure can be judiciously titrated with vasopressors to 120 to 140 mm Hg with frequent neurologic assessment. If no clinical improvement is seen within 72 hours of therapy, vasopressors are titrated down. In patients who have improvement with BP augmentation, an oral agent such as midodrine may be beneficial for long-term management. 22 Although study results provide preliminary evidence that increasing BP is beneficial in select patients with acute-subacute stroke, this therapy cannot be recommended for most patients. 25 Potential risks of raising BP include increased risk of hemorrhage, cardiac ischemia, arrhythmias, and congestive heart failure. *

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