Zen master one with everything

Please Share:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google
  • Pinterest
  • Reddit
  • Email
Like this: Like Loading... Previous article Dharma Field Trip: Fo Guang Shan Hsi Lai Temple Next article Smells Like Buddhist Nirvana Alan Peto Get New Buddhism Articles by Email A great way to keep updated on NEW Buddhism articles by Alan is to subscribe! Enter your email address below, and click the 'Subscribe' button, to get be notified anytime Alan writes a new article. This feature is powered by , and you can unsubscribe at any time.

From 1989 to 2010, Phil Jackson enjoyed one of the most successful coaching stints in NBA history. He won six titles with Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls, and five more with the Los Angeles Lakers, totaling a historic 11 championships. Now, Jackson has finally returned to Manhattan and to the New York Knicks, where he won two championships as a player. The 68-year-old, newly minted Knicks president will have the challenge of turning around one of the most dysfunctional franchises in all of professional sports. In the course of doing that, he may have to tap into his Zen qualities.

Given that’s the case, the closest we can come to describing Zen in words may be as follows:

  • Zen is more of an attitude than a belief.
     
  • Zen is the peace that comes from being one with an entity other than yourself.
     
  • Zen means being aware of your oneness with the world and everything in it.
     
  • Zen means living in the present and experiencing reality fully.
     
  • Zen means being free of the distractions and illusory conflicts of the material world.
     
  • Zen means being in the flow of the universe.
     
  • Zen means experiencing fully the present, and delighting in the basic miracle of life itself.
Paradox is a part of Zen and the teaching of Zen. A paradox nudges your mind into a direction other than the routine. It helps you disengage the rational mind and free up the intuition. It also points to a truth that cannot be rationally derived through the use of logic. Therefore:
  • Zen is nothing and yet everything.
     
  • Zen is both empty and full.
     
  • Zen encompasses all and is encompassed by all.
     
  • Zen is the beginning and the end.
It's easy for some to dismiss Zen as a bunch of mumbo-jumbo, devoid of real meaning. These would be the people who aren't yet ready to move up to this particular level of spiritual development. That's alright. Such things should not and indeed cannot be rushed. Michael Valentine Smith, the main character from Stranger in a Strange Land , would say that one must "wait for fullness" and that "waiting is ."
 

8. A novice was loading the larder with flour and oil and, spotting one of the monks under a banyan tree, asked him for help. "Sorry," said the monk, "I'm busy". "But your eyes are shut!" replied the student. "Yes, I'm busy doing nothing. It's much harder than what you're doing. It's what the food is for, it's what the kitchen is for, it's what the temple is for. Don't interrupt me again with your lardering." Hours later, with his task complete, the novice spotted the monk slouching on a bench and said, "Can we talk now?" "No," came the reply, "I haven't finished yet."

Zen master one with everything

zen master one with everything

8. A novice was loading the larder with flour and oil and, spotting one of the monks under a banyan tree, asked him for help. "Sorry," said the monk, "I'm busy". "But your eyes are shut!" replied the student. "Yes, I'm busy doing nothing. It's much harder than what you're doing. It's what the food is for, it's what the kitchen is for, it's what the temple is for. Don't interrupt me again with your lardering." Hours later, with his task complete, the novice spotted the monk slouching on a bench and said, "Can we talk now?" "No," came the reply, "I haven't finished yet."

Media:

zen master one with everythingzen master one with everythingzen master one with everythingzen master one with everythingzen master one with everything